All posts tagged: Small Press

bind, a waking book by C. Murray

Originally posted on Poethead by Chris Murray:
They and I, O how far we have fallen! Just to burn here. ? You can now order bind via Turas Press bind cover photograph is © Christian Caller, original artwork Bound / Boundless © Salma Ahmad Caller bind (Turas Press, 2018) was launched in Dublin on October the 8th 2018. I include here, with thanks, some details from artist Salma Caller’s response to the text. This is a note of thanks and appreciation to those people who have supported the book from the outset. Liz McSkeane, at Turas Press has written an introduction here  She has taken me through the process beautifully, including a visit to the type-setter, discussions on the visual art aspect of the book, and at all times she has kept me up to speed with the process. Turas is a new press, I urge poets to explore the possibility of publishing there. Eavan Boland very kindly read the text and provided an endorsement for me, I am very grateful to her for responding to the…

bind; a waking book by C. Murray

They and I, O how far we have fallen! Just to burn here.    You can now order bind via Turas Press bind cover photograph is © Christian Caller, original artwork Bound / Boundless © Salma Ahmad Caller from the Irish Times I am a poet without a landscape, a woman poet without a narrative heritage. I began tracing the huge startling landscape of US and European women’s poetry while in college. I could not find its equivalent here in Ireland. bind reflects the facts of absence and fragmentation in my poetry landscape, and the absence of women poets in our cultural narrative. bind is a book-length poem loosely divided into chapters. These chapters act as boundaries within the action of the poem and provide gateways to differing aspects of the processes inherent in bind. The title of the book takes its name from the triple hyphenation that occurs irregularly within the first chapter. bind explores movement, objects, and colours that occur in a no-place or a stasis, the fragmented landscape,   bind   if there are …

Review: Dispersal by Frances Holloway

  Dispersal By Frances Holloway   The clouds roll up in dairy scoops the anvil and the tower blowflies die their tiny deaths and thirsty gums shed flowers the silence falls, no magpie calls and then it moves-     the whisper wind to rattling applause   Dispersal is © Frances Holloway      Pomonal Publishing, 2014 Frances Holloway is a poet storyteller whose work is wry and full to bursting with ideas. Pomonal Publishing have done well in snaring the woman and bringing her work out. Holloway’s books capture a universe, they are almost nourishing. I say this as a reader who seeks visualism and colour in her poems. I look for intensity and light in a poem, I do not care if the light is dark or jewel-like,   Bilbao   Here we go merrily playing coffin games again the dead will out Have you seen the glass furnaces of Bilbao? How pretty in the sky at night those hypnotising spumes of purple green and blue but oh how putrid her river   How many times have we …

‘The Elm Tree’ by Peter O’Neill

The Elm Tree by Peter O’Neill   64 pages   Paperback   Lapwing Publications, 2014 Available at link The structure of Peter O’Neill’s The Elm Tree (Lapwing Publications, 2014) is quite interesting. The contents page is divided into five sections, each section is actually the name of a full poetry collection. Thus, the reader is confronted with shards of collections by O’Neill. Here we have a selected poetry by a writer who himself states that he has been writing for some years but this is only his second published book, the other being a chapbook produced in the U.S in 2013.   The Elm Tree comprises poems from The Dark Pool, The Muse is a Dominatrix, Fingal, Sweeney Amok-The Trees of Ephesus, and Dublin Gothic.   O’Neill is evidently a poet who is immersed in his themes, one wonders what provoked him to produce a selected work ? Up until last year, he, like so many other younger poets had been virtually ignored by the denizens of the ivory towers that have reduced Irish poetry …