All posts filed under: War

Alexander Cigale’s translation of Anna Akhmatova’s “Requiem”on Project Muse

  Alexander Cigale has retranslated Anna Akhmatova’s “Requiem” for Project Muse. I have been following the translation process for a while and I thought to add links here for readers of Akhmatova, including Cigale’s translations of Anna Akhmatova’s Minatures and a link to “Epilogue” from Requiem, Via Moving Poems EDIT: Alex Cigale has shared a link to his entire translation of Anna Akhmatova’s “Requiem” (Hopkins Review) for those readers who do not have a subscription to Project Muse. From The Prologue (Requiem) This isn’t me, someone else suffers. I couldn’t survive that. And what happened, May it be covered in coarse black cloth, Let them carry away the streetlights … Night. from Prologue (Requiem) by Anna Akhmatova translated by Alexander Cigale   Anna Andreyevna Gorenko better known by the pen name Anna Akhmatova was a Russian modernist poet, one of the most acclaimed writers in the Russian canon.   Akhmatova’s work ranges from short lyric poems to intricately structured cycles, such as Requiem (1935–40), her tragic masterpiece about the Stalinist terror. Her style, characterised by …

An Excerpt from “Delicate” at MarsPoetica (HiRISE), Single Poems

Delicate A sea snail, most precious egg, as if It had touched the ruby feather of a Bluebird. A most precious thing, Bird-egg-shattered, dust in my pores.   This excerpt from “Delicate” is © Christine-Elizabeth Murray. When we widen the lens, the bigger picture can be divorced from the reality that we think we may have momentarily grasped. The above poem is an excerpt from “Delicate” which is being submitted to an Irish Journal at the present time. I expect I will publish the poem in its entire at some later point. BUT here the poem is performing an imagistic collaborative function and I am very grateful to Ari who notified me of the #BeautifulMars and #MarsPoetica project via the Poethead Contact form. I hope to have more news on #MarsPoetica for readers and contributors to the blog soon ! About HiRISE (HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGING SCIENCE EXPERIMENT): The HiRISE camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is the most powerful one of its kind ever sent to another planet. Its high resolution allows us to see Mars …

‘Tread Softly’ and other poems by Michael J Whelan

DELIVERANCE In the orphanage a child cowers from cursing men outside. She wants to climb back into her dead mother’s womb and hide inside its warm, soft, un-edged safety, where no explanation is needed or reason to hide under splintered staircases or run the gauntlet to basement bomb shelters, existing minute to minute with strangers until the dawn arrives with her deliverance and she refuses to be born. © Michael J. Whelan (Published in Cyphers, Nov 2011) GRAPES OF WRATH   It happens on a Thursday, just after 2pm, when ancient cultures and beliefs conspire and vultures spiral above a peacekeepers’ camp, where cedars age slowly and the Litani River caresses the ground where Jesus turned water into wine, where artillery salvos rip the air on their long flight and bite deep, deep into that place of safety vaporizing its concrete walls and burning and blistering and tearing apart the mass of terrified flesh and innocent blood seeking refuge from the hate of man. A soldier climbs from the rubble limbs and discarded faces, his …

‘Haft Seen’ and other poetry by Shakila Azizzada

Once Upon A Time   in memory of Leila Sarahat Roshani   Granny used to say always keep your magic sack tucked inside your ribcage.   Don’t say the sun’s worn out, don’t say it’s gone astray. Say, I’m coming back.   May the White Demon protect and watch over you. Oh, daughter of the dawn,   perhaps this sorry tale, stuck in the mud, was of your doing.   Take the comb from the sack, throw it in the Black Demon’s path: seven jungles will grow at his feet.   Don’t say heaven’s too far, earth’s too hard. Don’t throw the mirror if you fear the sea and her nymphs.   Don’t say there was, don’t say there wasn’t, trust in the god of fairytales. May Granny’s soul rest in peace.   Give the mirror to Golnar’s mother who, down by the charred vineyards, dreams of birds and fish.   Don’t say the rooftop’s sun’s too brief. Say, I’m coming and this time, forget love’s foolish griefs.   Shake out the sack. In the …

Transverse threads; two women poets and Homer

The weft of  Margaret Atwood‘s The Penelopiad is contained in and revealed through the chorus voiced by the twelve maids  hung by Telemachus (on Odysseus’ orders) just after the men returned from their manly adventures. Margaret Atwood runs the chorus line throughout her Penelopiad, the executed maids sing their songs at ten intervals in the book. I was struck by a comment that Atwood makes in her notes about the maids. She stated that: ‘The Chorus of Maids is a tribute to such uses of choruses in Greek Drama. The convention of burlesquing the main action was present in the satyr plays before the main drama.’ (Margaret Atwood, Author Notes for The Penelopiad pp. 197-198) I am always interested in how women writers burlesque the heroic perception of the classics through use of device and structural underpinning. In this instance I have been reading Atwood’s The Penelopiad and Alice Oswald‘s Memorial. Both Atwood and Oswald approach Homeric themes in a sidelong fashion to get to the meat of the oral tradition, their poetic focus is decidedly on the lament. Atwood …