What Kind of Love Leaves a Cunt-scar ? by Chris Murray

What Kind of Love Leaves a Cunt-scar ?

the bee-sting

I arise to close
the heavy window
against cold fog

and her woods are littered
with little death

of sucked out corpses
and dessicate(d) fruit flies

and I feel the scar

snaking

ridged

against

and spider scatters into
her charnel house
fast-as-light

and her webs are
an ocean of exoskeletons

 

© Chris Murray, a version if this poem appeared in And Agamemnon Dead: An Anthology Of Early Twenty First Century Irish Poetry.The official launch of the anthology will be take place in Skerries, Ireland on the 23rd May during the Donkey Shots, Skerries First International Avant Garde Poetry Festival

Christine Murray
Christine Murray

Christine Murray is a graduate of Art History and English Literature (UCD, Belfield, Dublin 4). She is a City and Guilds qualified restoration stonecutter (OPW). Her chapbook Three Red Things was published by Smithereens Press in June 2013. A collection of poems Cycles was published by Lapwing Press in Autumn 2013 . A dark tale The Blind was published by Oneiros Books late in 2013. Her second book length poem She was published in Spring 2014 (Oneiros Books). A chapbook Signature was published in March 2014 by Bone Orchard Press.

What Kind of Love Leaves a Cunt-scar ? by Chris Murray

‘Crystal Clear’ and other poems by Eileen T O’Neill

Crystal Clear

 
She sits alone within her own cocoon,
Shrouded from her entire surroundings.
Eyes stare without seeing today’s world,
The sound of talking is silent in her mind.
Her crystal lamp is abandoned from care,
All belongings are deserted from attention.
Her perspective is internally facing forever,
Her gaze is transparent in its sad emptiness.
This journey is taken in isolation and alone,
Farewells too late as her departure had gone.
Her dementia deteriorated in a sneaky fashion,
Only memories enliven her past participation.
 
© Copyright Eileen T O’Neill 20/02/2015
 

Solitude’s Soliloquy

 
Loneliness is an outpost endured,
Alone in isolation bereft of friends.
A far flung niche deserted in tundra,
Or lost in the coldness of city living.
It shrouds demeanour and self-belief,
Belonging is seemingly for all others.
Unattached except for wishful dreaming,
Solitude does not placate a lonely mind.
Seclusion is at times a necessity of desire,
Its calmness affords tranquillity to muse.
Reflections gaze and ponder their silences,
In this solitudinous mode one draws breaths.
A soliloquy considered in quiet contemplation,
This position sits well in the stillness of being.
 

© Copyright Eileen T O’Neill 19/02/2015
 

Rebirth and Opportunity

 
Making that first bold move takes much courage,
The contemplation and the deliberation were easy.
Stepping away from what was life’s familiarity then,
Every worldly possession uprooted and packed away.
Closing doors of the old abode was a surreal moment,
Pulling the garden gate shut and not daring to look back.
Nearest and dearest confused in the midst of changes,
Looking beyond the confines of what had been home.
Promise and dreams awaited in a flight of sixty minutes,
The arrival revealed an environment of boring normality.
Leafy slumbers of countryside living in a haven of safety,
Opportunities grasped at every turning point of direction.
One could sit and contemplate the nothingness of something,
Or simply taste life free from the scourges of its daily violence.
That momentous date of departure remains in minds forever,
Yet a rebirth evolved from the perspective of fresh beginnings.
 
© Copyright Eileen T O’Neill 14/01/2015

XdxI_-Ln_400x400Eileen T O’Neill was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland. She lives in Cheshire, England. Mum to four wonderful and loving children and one beautiful grandchild.
 
Eileen’s Website
‘Crystal Clear’ and other poems by Eileen T O’Neill

AND AGAMEMNON DEAD : An Anthology of Early Twenty First Century Irish Poetry

Christine-Elizabeth Murray:

Thanks to Michael J Whelan for this post on ‘And Agamemnon Dead: An Anthology of Early Twenty First Century Irish Poetry’ 

Originally posted on Michael J. Whelan - Writer:

And Agamemnon Dead An Anthology of Early Twenty First Century Irish Poetry Edited by Peter O'Neill & Walter Ruhlmann And Agamemnon Dead
An Anthology of Early Twenty First Century Irish Poetry
Edited by Peter O’Neill & Walter Ruhlmann

Hi everyone, I’m really happy to announce that a brand new anthology of contemporary Irish poetry has been published today (St Patrick’s Day) in Paris and I am also delighted to say that I have five poems included in the collection alongside a number of exciting and interesting new voices coming out of Ireland in the these early years of the 21st Century.

And Agamemnon Dead An Anthology of Early Twenty First Century Irish Poetry, Edited by Peter O’Neill & Walter Ruhlmann is published by Muavaise Graine (Paris 2015) –

see https://www.facebook.com/mgversion2datura

and among its 187 pages you will find poetry from

Michael McAloran — Amos Greig — Dylan Brennan — Christine Murray — Arthur Broomfield — Peter O’ Neill — Rosita Sweetman — Michael J. Whelan — Anamaría Crowe Serrano —…

View original 227 more words

AND AGAMEMNON DEAD : An Anthology of Early Twenty First Century Irish Poetry

Let’s Hear Irish Poets Speak; the need for a poetry audiobank in Ireland

Christine-Elizabeth Murray:

The fact that a new generation of emergent writers must await vehicles like Poetry Ireland Introductions to find an audience stinks of a paternalistic approach to poetic works that sees a few dominant poets stand between the reader and the work, as if it were radioactive. The poetry audience is not remedial and they like to go searching, hence from Ireland they will go to where accessibility is respected, to UBUWEB, to PENNSound, to Jacket2, to The Electronic Poetry Center.

Originally posted on The Bogman's Cannon:

The Electronic Poetry Center (U.S) was founded in 1995. UBUWEB was founded by Kenneth Goldsmith in 1996, it is an audio archive housing avant-garde works including visual, concrete and sound poetry, UBU also holds film files. PENNSound was founded in 2003. To date, not one Irish University has made a step towards providing accessible poetry archives in Ireland. Poetry Ireland has not gone an inch toward increasing accessibility to Irish audio poetry. Why is this ?

Whatever way we choose to look at this situation, we can see that despite the tourist push on arts here, we are one to two generations behind best practice in the area of accessibility to audio poetry. Instead we have a focus on pushing a few poets, mainly to the American market, and beneath the colossus-like feet of the Yeats, the Muldoons, the Heaneys, and the presidential poets, the green shoots are strangled and…

View original 710 more words

Let’s Hear Irish Poets Speak; the need for a poetry audiobank in Ireland

Dear Freda Laughton, Your Poems are being discussed at Jacket2 Magazine

Dear Freda Laughton, Your Poems are being discussed at Jacket2 Magazine:

Walt Hunter writes for Jacket2 on Dave Lordan’s interview with Emma Penney about the modernist poet Freda Laughton. Freda Laughton was born in Bristol in 1907 and moved to Co. Down after her marriage. She published one collection of poetry, A Transitory House, in 1945 but little else is known about her life and work. She may have lived in Dublin for sometime, as her poem The Welcome details the textures of Dublin City and its suburbs, and suggests she knows the city by heart. Her date of death is unknown.There are some Freda Laughton poems published on Poethead here

The most interesting thing I read during a weekend of convalescence, under a March sun that seemed surprised at its own intensity, was this interview with Emma Penney on the website The Bogman’s Cannon about an Irish modernist poet, Freda Laughton. Although Laughton was born in 1907, I feature the interview and her poems here because critical genealogies of twentieth-century Irish poetry are in the process of expanding dramatically. Laughton provides an alternative provenance and inspiration for some of today’s writers and their concerns or interventions—as Penney points out:

The lack of critical interest in Laughton reflects the selective vision of literary traditions which often exclude poets who do not fit with the contemporary moment or who may trouble the formation of new movements. Irish critics during the 70’s and 80’s held Eavan Boland to be the first writer to express what “poetic being” was for a woman; the first to express the domestic; motherhood; the first to map Dublin city as a woman. Laughton expresses all of these experiences in her work decades before Boland.

You can read the full article here Now I am a tower of darkness | Jacket2.

FireShot Capture - Now I am a tower of dark_ - http___jacket2.org_commentary_now-i-am-tower-darkness
Dear Freda Laughton, Your Poems are being discussed at Jacket2 Magazine