All posts filed under: Northern Irish Women Poets

Recent Additions to The Fired! Archive at RASCAL (QUB)

  The RASCAL database at Queen’s University, Belfast, has hosted Fired! Irish Poets since early February 2019.  Fired! Irish Poets was established in the summer of 2017 to address issues of marginalisation and the neglect of Irish women poets in both the contemporary and historical poetry canon. Recent additions to the database include Eavan Boland (1944-2020): Obituaries and tributes for Eavan Boland, Hidden Collections: The Value of Irish Literary Archives, under the headings, ‘Critical Failures’, ‘The Shape of the literary archive’, ‘Women Writers in the archive’, and ‘The living archive‘, by Lucy Collins for The Irish University Review (50), and Periodical Codes: ‘Centre’, ‘Margin’ and Gender in Poetry Ireland Review during the early 1980s” by Laura Loftus. EDIT: 28/06/2020 Another recent addition to the Fired! archive went live today Why Uncomplicated Recovery Isn’t Enough: Rhoda Coghill, Her Letters, and the Fired! Movement by Kathy D’Arcy. The RASCAL Database is an electronic gateway to research resources relating to Ireland. The site can be used to search or browse information about a wide range of research and special …

Un incontro / An encounter and other poems by Viviana Fiorentino, translated by Maria McManus

Poet’s Note These poems that I submitted are a part of my experience as a volunteer in an immigrant detention centre in Northern Ireland. They were written in Italian and translated into English by the poet Maria McManus. The English language versions appear beneath the poems.                              – Viviana Fiorentino Approdo i Cielo, tu sei troppo grande; blu di Persia – non ti conosco.   ii io ti chiamo, Terra; dammi un suolo per questi piedi una casa alle mie incertezze un rifugio per dubitare.   iii Un posto per vivere.   Landing i Sky, you are too big; Persian Blue – I cannot know you.   ii Instead, I call on you, Land; give me a place to put my feet, a home for my uncertainty, a place to doubt.   iii A place to live.   Approdo / Landing © Viviana Fiorentino, english trans by Maria McManus   Correnti Ora è questo un manto di alghe e sale sotto il …

A Celebration of Women’s Poetry on International Women’s Day 2019

Image: Srilata Krishnan Poethead has been celebrating the achievements of women writers, editors and translators for over a decade. International Women’s Day 2019 is no exception. This year I have decided to highlight the work of women poets from my international index and to introduce my readers to some new Irish poets. I am very grateful to all the poets who submit to the site, especially for their patience. I do not think we would be heading into eleven years this March 2019 without the generous support and uplift that comes from my daily correspondence. Thank you, C. Murray, March 2019 ‘Birth Mother’ by Srilata Krishnan   We are standing in front of the mirror, my daughter and I, brushing our hair and being vain when I think of the doctor’s question: “What was her birth cry like?” I don’t know and never will. She is fine, or will be, I know. But looking in the mirror and into her almond eyes, I wonder what she is like – her birth mother – if she …

“The Unfinished Poem” and other poems by Caroline Johnstone

The Unfinished Poem The house his mind once called its home Has gaping roofs, and paint-cracked eaves, Of forget-me-not blues The frosted brittle skeletons of history and wit served now As a porridge of forgetfulness, faint echoes haunt Sweet gentle kisses of remembrance Dementia’s wraiths roam shadowed emptied rooms, Herald long laments for lonely roads where memories float In space yet give no hope, no sense of place. As Alice keeps on falling down the rabbit-holes of grief The curtains close on last acts interrupted. Observers weep at unfinished poems. 1771 – The American Wake (published by The Galway Review) My firstborn child declared his independence, Said he would choose to live, not die, by drought that stalked us all, Or drown by workhouse shame. The death knell rang. America had called, cried freedom, hope. He left our land, was pushed by fear, by poverty that gnawed his soul, And pulled by hope, and images of greener lands than these. While on the hill, the landlord nodded, raised the rents And watched our young ones …

Merry Christmas 2018 Dear Poethead Readers ♥

Poetry publishing will resume in January 2019. I will be reading and responding to your submissions in the intervening period. Thank you for your emails, your queries, your support and responses over this year of 2018. As always, the site remains open and accessible. Please visit An Index Of Women Poets and Contemporary Irish Women Poets during the season.  My thanks to Salma Caller, whose wonderful artistic response to my 2018 publications graces this message, her work can be found throughout Poethead. Thanks to the many poets who submitted during 2018. Your tremendous work was an utter joy to read. Thank you for your patience in waiting for publication. I am delighted to have welcomed first-time poets, poet-translators, and work from experienced poets through this past year. Merry Christmas and best wishes for the season. The image accompanying this short post reminds me that in January, the first flowers begin appearing, something wonderful to look forward to.  (Image details) Chris Murray December 2018 Contemporary Irish Women Poets An Index Of Women Poets Recent features on Poethead  …