All posts filed under: How Words Play

‘The Whetter of the Knife’ and other poems by Judith Mok

Beethoven in New York Fur Elise This night is on me like a blank sheet I have to write Of people playing my music that Fills the subway with my submerged sounds As if I am a whale vibrating through the thick of times Communicating that my name is: Beethoven A man of music in a storm of voices A choir, an army of American instruments People playing my music, people judging me How I rode this crushing wave of emotions I wake up to chaos and constellations in my head Thinking: I will have to tell her I heard this choir supporting some statement about me Thinking: it’s one breath of mine against three of hers That’s what our rhythm seems to be I hear this couple talking Two voices modulating into one Softly speaking specters of promises I spy on her asleep Sensing a child in her with too many dreams To chose from, her jaws clenched To keep them inside till they rot While she dies slowly in her sleep. Casual chords …

Let’s Hear Irish Poets Speak; the need for more poetry audiobanks in Ireland

Since this plea was published at The Bogman’s Cannon, I have been notified that one Irish University has been creating a collection of audio poetry. This was brought to my attention via comments under the original posting. Please check out the Seamus Heaney Centre Digital Archive & The Queen’s University, Belfast, Archives. The Electronic Poetry Center (U.S) was founded in 1995. UBUWEB was founded by Kenneth Goldsmith in 1996, it is an audio archive housing avant-garde works including visual, concrete and sound poetry, UBU also holds film files.  PENNSound was founded in 2003. To date, one Irish University has made a step towards providing accessible poetry archives in Ireland. Poetry Ireland has not gone an inch toward increasing accessibility to Irish audio poetry. Why is this?  Whatever way we choose to look at this situation, we can see that despite the tourist push on arts here. Ireland is one to two generations behind best practice in the area of accessibility to audio poetry. We focus on pushing a few poets (mainly to the American market) and …

‘Janus- His Mistress Responds’ and other poems by Peter O’Neill

Kitchen Maid with the Supper at Emmaus, by Diego Velasquez (1617-1618) For Máire Holmes Through the serving hatch, or silent butler, The Christ is seen at the moment of revelation, While the maid, in the foreground, averts her eyes From the immediate task at hand. The bowl, which is falling from the table, Like a globe, and which has just startled her Is certainly for mixing the ingredients; As the garlic lying temptingly to her side would testify. With it, no doubt, the contents of the mortar; Pepper and the ‘fine spice’ to add to her Dobladura De Carnero – Hercules being Mythologised in the toasted hazelnuts. Circumnavigating the room, bread breaks to thunder clap, And the bowl erupts at the announcement of the returning of the lamb. Dies Solis… An unseen yellow dwarf, over one million KMs In diameter, transforming 620 million mega tons Of hydrogen into helium per second, in a process Of thermo nuclear fusion, generates luminance, Which is transported upon solar winds, Taking eight minutes and sixteen seconds to touch The …

‘Bind’ by Chris Murray

Bind   if there are birds here then they are of stone   draught of birds / flesh bone wing claw in grass,   rilled etch gathers to her nets dust and fire / tree-step (again)   bird claw impinge and lift.   surely light would retain in silica’s cast or flaw ?   bind again   it gathers outside the perimeter not wanton gargoyle nor eagle it is  of-one-piece       seamed   migratory pattern of   umber dawns rolling a black frenzy down condensed corridors   bind I and bind again were first published in Deep Water Literary Journal (August 2015) Thanks to Tom and Eve O’Reilly at Deep Water Literary Journal for publishing ‘bind’. The new DWLJ is online now and it is well worth a visit. I am adding here a link to Tom D’Evelyn’s blog. Tom wrote about the ideas in ‘bind’. I am, and have been very grateful to Tom who has written so graciously about my work for sometime now. Poets require readers who react to and understand the work, especially when …

‘The Dream Clock’ and other visual poetry by Susan Connolly

Susan Connolly’s first collection of poetry For the Stranger was published by the Dedalus Press in 1993. She was awarded the Patrick and Katherine Kavanagh Fellowship in Poetry in 2001. Her second collection Forest Music was published by Shearsman Books in 2009. Shearsman published her chapbook The Sun-Artist: a book of pattern poems in 2013. She lives in Drogheda, Co. Louth.