All posts filed under: 25 Pins in a packet women creators

The Penelopiad

‘Lifelike’ and other poems by Jennifer Matthews

Family Portraits   “With skin like that, you don’t have to open your mouth.”   Muting praise; Mother twirled back the sardine-tin key of his sister’s tongue.   Richard Avedon, embryonic photographer fixed his Kodax Box Brownie on Sister, to exhume her from her own beauty.   … she believed she existed only as skin, and hair, and a beautiful body …   He sought sun, the negative of his muse in hand to place on his shoulder: used his own skin as a contact sheet for the image to burn into him, to carry her as widows clutch framed photos of loved ones lost to war.   ok   1.   His tattoo: a stitch of self harm, a barcode, a brand, a word he wants so badly to replace his own skin that he signs consent to be burnt blue. He lies down to give his flesh to the upper-hand, the cruel beautician.   2.   Beauty is nothing but a flaw so stunning it can’t be ignored. Its twin image burrows into …

‘Bind’ by Chris Murray

Bind   if there are birds here then they are of stone   draught of birds / flesh bone wing claw in grass,   rilled etch gathers to her nets dust and fire / tree-step (again)   bird claw impinge and lift.   surely light would retain in silica’s cast or flaw ?   bind #2   it gathers outside the perimeter not wanton gargoyle nor eagle it is of-one-piece   seamed   migratory pattern of   umber dawns rolling their black frenzy down condensed corridors   bind I and II was first published in Deep Water Literary Journal (August 2015) Thanks to Tom and Eve O’Reilly at Deep Water Literary Journal for publishing ‘bind’. The new DWLJ is online now and it is well worth a visit. I am adding here a link to Tom D’Evelyn’s blog. Tom wrote about the ideas in ‘bind’. I am, and have been very grateful to Tom who has written so graciously about my work for sometime now. Poets require readers who react to and understand the work, especially when …

‘The Dream Clock’ and other visual poetry by Susan Connolly

Susan Connolly’s first collection of poetry For the Stranger was published by the Dedalus Press in 1993. She was awarded the Patrick and Katherine Kavanagh Fellowship in Poetry in 2001. Her second collection Forest Music was published by Shearsman Books in 2009. Shearsman published her chapbook The Sun-Artist: a book of pattern poems in 2013. She lives in Drogheda, Co. Louth.

‘Mulcair’ and other poems by Amanda Bell

The beauty of the game   is lost on me when I watch you play. I see the curve of your cheek, the rounded base of your skull – once a custom-fit for my palm – and feel again the warm weight of your incipience.   No more walnut-snug in my armour your head now bobs around the pitch and air shrieks with the thwack of plastic against wood, against bone.   (first published by The Ofi Press)   Dark Days   i.m. Savita Halappanavar   Suspended at the end of Krishna Paksha, the moon is a sickle freeze-framed in the night sky.   The fireworks have been cancelled, replaced by candles and a vision of you dancing on the cusp.   These are dark days between Diwali and Advent, waiting   for the moon to wax. (first published by the Burning Bush 2)   Troglodytes   On visiting Lascaux cave for the 70th anniversary of its discovery   Inland, the road torcs into forest. Among walnut trees, the house vibrates with life: bees, hummingbird …

Looking at how the media presented the Oxford Professor of Poetry Election for VIDA !

There is an interest for women poets in how media presents electoral processes like the recent Oxford Professor of Poetry appointment. Just as there is an interest in how media views poetry generally. “I would like to see something different at the next election. I would like to see the media discussing women poets and the benefits that they can bring to the chair, and how their role can influence emerging women poets. I feel that this can be achieved by speaking to women candidates with intelligence and not utilising them as filler material in your ossified view of what poetry is.” (VIDA)   I started Poethead as a platform that could create visibility for women poets and their translators. Poetry is primarily a process of creation, however, media often engages with poetry at the point where it has become a product, often within the published book. This convergence of media and poetry was always going to be problematic. That a lifetime of creative effort goes into a finished book or books is not recognised by …