How Words Play, War

True that the Women Burnt a Tea-House at Kew Gardens; but it was only a little One, by Rebecca West

Cicily Fairfield/Rebecca West

” It is true that the women burnt a tea-house at Kew Gardens; but it was only a little one. And I can understand why they attacked this place of innocuous pleasure, for I spent a little time of sleepy pleasure there one sunny day last summer. At the next table sat a dear old parson with silver hair and gold rimmed spectacles, and a pale young curate. During the three hours I was there they talked with delicate gravity and an air of profound culture about a correspondence in The Spectator about the decay of the subjunctive mood in modern English. The Burning of the tea-house was an honest attempt to overcome the difficulties felt by all reformers of getting in touch with people who are snowed under by decaying subjunctives. No doubt the parson and curate are now, in some refined Anglican manner, busy wishing suffragettes the devil..,”

One of the women who burned the tea-house , Ms Emily Davison, died as a result of maltreatment in Prison. She was force-fed during hunger-strike leading to food flowing into her lung cavity and eventual death from septicaemia.

The above is excerpted from The Clarion , 28th of February 1913.

Some people believe that feminism has entered a post period, I would think it more imperative than ever to engage with issues pertinent to women who are at the lowest levels of democratic representation. The Orthodox moral views of woman that are undealt with are coupled with a facile democratic tokenism which determines health and social policies in countries of rampant technological progress. Or as I said to an American writer ;

‘They still got Eve wrapped round the tree only now she is toting Viagra’

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