Contemporary Irish Women Poets

‘I wanted to read or hear the narrative of someone else – a woman and a poet – who has gone here and been there.’ Eavan Boland

Below are short biographies and links to women poets who have either sent work to Poethead, or whose works I have published to highlight women’s poetry over these six years. It is a growing list, and by no means complete. I have recently begun categorising Contemporary Irish Women Poets due to a high search engine demand for work by Irish Women Poets. 

nualaNuala Ní Dhomhnaill  was born in 1952 and grew up in the Irish-speaking areas of West Kerry and in Tipperary. She studied English and Irish at University College, Cork in 1969 and became part of a group of Irish language poets who were published in the literary magazine Innti. She now lives in Dublin.

She has published four collections of poems in Irish, An Dealg Droighin (1981), Féar Suaithinseach (1984), Feis (1991) and Cead Aighnis (1998). From The Gallery Press.

 

The Bond by Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAfric McGlinchey’s début poetry collection, The Lucky Star Of Hidden Things was published by Salmon Poetry in 2012. She was highly commended in the Magma 2012 competition, shortlisted in the Bridport 2012 and won the Northern Liberties Poetry Prize (USA) in 2013. She won the Hennessy poetry award in 2011. Her poems have been published in Ireland, England and the States, in numerous print and online journals.

Poetry by Afric McGlinchey

eleEleanor Hooker’s debut collection of poems The Shadow Owner’s Companion, published by the Dedalus Press in February 2012, has been shortlisted for the Mountains to Sea dlr, Strong/Shine award for best first collection in 2012. Her poem A Rite won the Trocaire/Poetry Ireland competition in June 2013.

Her poetry has been published in The Irish Times, Poetry Ireland Review, The Stinging Fly, The SHOp, Agenda, POEM: International English Language Quarterly, Southword (forthcoming), CanCan, Wordlegs, And Other Poems, ink sweat and tears (forthcoming).She is a founder member and Programme Curator for the Dromineer Literary Festival. She is a helm and Press Officer for Lough Derg RNLI Lifeboat.

Poetry by Eleanor Hooker

Author-pic-Emily-CullenDr. Emily Cullen is an Irish writer, scholar, harpist and arts manager. Her first poetry collection, entitled No Vague Utopia was published by Ainnir in 2003. In 2004 she was the national Programme Director of the Patrick Kavanagh Centenary celebrations and was selected for the Poetry Ireland Introductions series. Emily was awarded an IRCHSS Government of Ireland fellowship for her doctoral study on the Irish harp. She is a qualified teacher of the harp who has performed throughout Europe, Australia and the United States. A former member of the Belfast Harp Orchestra, she has recorded on a number of albums and also as a solo artist. In addition to writing poetry, short stories and feature articles, she publishes widely on aspects of Irish cultural history and music.

Poems from ‘In Between Angels and Animals

niEiléan Ní Chuilleanáin is the daughter of Eilís Dillon and Professor Cormac Ó Cuilleanáin. She was educated at University College Cork and The University of Oxford. She lives in Dublin with her husband Macdara Woods, and they have one son, Niall. She is a Fellow of Trinity College Dublin and an emeritus professor of the School of English which she joined in 1966. Her broad academic interests (notably her specialism in Renaissance literature and her interest in translation) are reflected in her poetry. She retired from full-time teaching in 2011. Ní Chuilleanáin is a founder of the literary magazine Cyphers. Her first collection won the Patrick Kavanagh Poetry Award in 1973. In 2010 The Sun-fish was the winner of the Canadian-based International Griffin Poetry Prize and was shortlisted for the Poetry Now Award.

Poetry By Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin 

photo-26Denise Blake has two collections, Take a Deep Breath (2004) How to Spin Without Getting Dizzy (2010) published by Summer Palace Press She is a regular contributor to RTE radio 1′s show, Sunday Miscellany. Denise read as part of the Poetry Ireland’s Lunchtime Series and at ÓBhéal as well as many other readings around the country. She is on the Poetry Ireland directory for Writers in Schools and has wide experience facilitating workshops for adults.

Poems by Denise Blake

Maria McManus

Maria McManus

Maria McManus is a poet and playwright. Maria’s most recent work is We are Bone (Lagan Press 2013). A screenplay adaptation of the sequence Aill na Searrach; The Leap of the Foals, was developed in 2013 with NI Screen as part of the Short Steps development process.
 
Previous poetry includes The Cello Suites (Lagan Press 2009), which has been recorded with an original score composed and played by the cellist Tom Hughes. She is a contributing artist to Corners of Europe.
 
Reading the Dog (Lagan Press 2006) her first collection of poetry, was runner up in the 2007 Strong Awards at the Poetry Now International Festival and was also short-listed for the 2007 Glen Dimplex New Writers Award. In 2008 & 2012 she was awarded an Arts Council individual artist award. In 2005 she was awarded the inaugural Bedell Scholarship for Literature and World Citizenship, by the Aspen Writers’ Foundation, Colorado USA. She was awarded an MA with Distinction in English (Creative Writing) from Queen’s University Belfast in addition to a professional qualification in Occupational Therapy and an MBA from the University of Ulster.
 
In 2008 she co-wrote Bruised for Tinderbox Theatre Company. In 2006/07 she was playwright on attachment to Tinderbox. Previous theatre credits include His n Her’s and Nowhere Harder (2006) for Replay Theatre Company, and The Black-Out Show (2006) for Red Lead Arts.
 
Something For Sunday Morning by Maria McManus

grVona Groarke is an Irish poet. Groarke was born in Mostrim in the Irish midlands in 1964, and attended Trinity College, Dublin, and University College, Cork. She has published five collections of poetry with the Gallery Press (and by Wake Forest University Press in the United States): Shale (1994), Other People’s Houses (1999), Flight (2002), Juniper Street (2006) and Spindrift (2009). She is also the author of a translation of the eighteenth-century Irish poem Lament for Art O’Leary (Caoineadh Airt Uí Laoghaire) (Gallery Books, 2008).
Her work has been recognized with awards including the Brendan Behan Memorial Award, the Hennessy Award, the Michael Hartnett Award, the Forward Prize, and the Strokestown International Poetry Award. Her 2009 volume Spindrift has been nominated for the 2010 Irish Times Poetry Now Award.
She has been a co-holder of the Heimbold Chair of Irish Studies at Villanova University and has taught at Wake Forest University in North Carolina; she now teaches at the Centre for New Writing at the University of Manchester, and in 2010 was elected a member of Aosdána, the Irish academy of the arts. (Wiki)

Indoors by Vona Groarke

vcMaeve O’Sullivan works as a media lecturer in the further education sector in Dublin. Her poems and haiku have been widely published and anthologised since the mid-1990s, and she is a former poetry winner at Listowel Writer’s Week. Initial Response, her debut collection of haiku poetry, also from Alba Publishing, was launched in 2011, and was well-received by readers and critics alike. Maeve is a founder member of Haiku Ireland  and the Hibernian Poetry Workshop. She also performs at festivals and literary events with the spoken word group The Poetry Divas. Her poem Leaving Vigo was recently nominated for a Forward Prize for a Single Poem by the Limerick-based journal Revival.

Vocal Chords by Maeve O’Sullivan

snapshot_201305251Christine Murray is a City and Guilds qualified stone-cutter living in Dublin, Ireland. Her Chapbook, Three Red Things was published by Smithereens Press in June 2013. A collection of poems Cycles was published by Lapwing Press in 2013. A dark tale The Blind (Poetry) was published by Oneiros Books in 2013. Her second book-length poem She was published in Spring 2014 (Oneiros Books). Her second chapbook Signature was published in March 2014 by Bone Orchard Press.

Recours au Poème: Poésies & Mondes Poétiques

ni-chonchc3bair1Nuala Ní Chonchuir was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1970, Nuala Ní Chonchúir is a fiction writer and poet. She has published one novel, four collections of short fiction, a chapbook of flash fiction and three full poetry collections – one in an anthology. Nuala’s second novel, The Closet of Savage Mementos was published by New Island in April 2014. 

Nuala holds a BA in Irish from Trinity College Dublin and a Masters in Translation Studies (Irish/English) from Dublin City University. She has worked as an arts administrator in theatre and in a writers’ centre; as a translator, as a bookseller and also in a university library.

Nuala teaches creative writing on a part-time basis. She lives in County Galway with her husband and three children. (from Nuala’s Blog)

Die Schwangere by Nuala Ni Chonchuir

kellyKelly Creighton is a Belfast born writer and editor. Lapwing Publications published her debut poetry collection Three Primes in September 2013.Her work has been featured in numerous literary magazines, print and online, including:The Stinging Fly, Cyphers, Long Story Short, Literary Orphans, Wordlegs, The Galway Review, The Bohemyth, A New Ulster, Ink Sweat and Tears, Boyne Berries, Skylight 47, The Poetry Bus, Poethead, PEN Austria’s protest e-book, Whiskey Paper, Synaesthesia Magazine, The Pygmy Giant, Papergirl Belfast, translated for Recours au Poeme and elsewhere.

Redeeming Faith by Kelly Creighton

dorothea-herbertDorothea Herbert (c.1767-1829) was an Irish diarist and poet. Her Retrospections, first published in two volumes in 1929-30, contain local accounts of life in the late eighteenth century, but are soon overshadowed by her unrequited passion for John Roe, heir to Rockwell near Knockgrafton, another of her father’s parishes.[1]

She was the eldest daughter of Rev. Nicholas Herbert, rector of Carrick-on-Suir, County Tipperary, Ireland. In spite of increasing isolation, depression and derangement, she wrote plays, novels and other works, none of which can be accounted for. Her Volume of Poetry, however, has survived; it, along with her Journal Notes (a continuation of her Retrospections), have recently been published as a biography by historian Dr. Frances Finnegan.

 

Dorothea Herbert on Poethead

maireMáire Mhac an tSaoi (born 4 April 1922) is one of the most acclaimed and respected Irish language scholars, poets, writers and academics of modern literature in Irish. Along with Seán Ó Ríordáin and Máirtín Ó Direáin she is, in the words of Louis de Paor, ‘one of a trinity of poets who revolutionised Irish language poetry in the 1940s and 50s. (Wiki)

Ceathrúintí Mháire Ní Ógáin’ and ‘A fhir dar fhulaingeas’ by Máire Mhac an tSaoi

admin-ajaxAine MacAodha a 51 year old writer, training in alternative medicines. Lives in Omagh her works have appeared in, Doghouse Anthology of Irish haiku titled, Bamboo Dreams, Poethead Blog, Glasgow Review, Enniscorthy Echo, poems translated into Italian and Turkish, honorable mention in Diogen winter Haiku contest, thefirscut issues #6 and #7, Outburst magazine, A New Ulster issues 2 and 4, Pirene’s Fountain Japanese Short Form Issue, DIOGEN, Poetry broadcast on ‘ Words on Top’ radio show, recently published in, The Best of Pirene’s Fountain’ First Water, Revival and Boyne Berries, She published two volumes of poetry, ‘Where the Three rivers Meet’ and Guth An Anam (voice of the soul). Argotist online recently published ‘Where the Three rivers Meet’ as a free ebook.

Fire of the Gaels on Poethead

from Irish Writers Online

from Irish Writers Online

Eithne Strong was born in Limerick in 1925 and wrote poetry both in English and Irish, as well as writing novels and short stories in English. Her poetry collections includes: Cirt Oibre (1980), Fuill agus Fallaí (1983), Aoife fé Ghlas (1990), An Sagart Pinc (1990), Poetry Quartos (1943-45), Songs of Living (1961), Sarah in Passing (1974), Flesh – The Greatest Sin (1980), My Darling Neighbour (1985), Let Live (1990), Spatial Nosing – New and Selected Poems (1993), and Flesh – The Greatest Sin (new edition, 1993). She published a collection of short stories, Patterns (1981), and novels to her name include Degrees of Kindred (1979) and The Love Riddle (1993). In 1991 she won the Kilkenny Design Award for Flesh – The Greatest Sin.  She was a member of Aosdána, dying in Monkstown, Dublin in 1999. (from The Munster Literature Centre)

Forever Eve by Eithne Strong

fb5Fiona Bolger’s work has appeared in Headspace, Southword, The Brown Critique, Can Can, Boyne Berries, Poetry Bus, The Chattahoochee Review, Bare Hands Poetry Anthology and others. Her poems first appeared in print on placards tied to lamp posts (UpStart 2011 General Election Campaign). They’ve also been on coffee cups (The Ash Sessions). Her grimoire, The Geometry of Love between the Elements, was published by Poetry Bus Press. She is of Dublin and Chennai and is a member of Dublin Writers’ Forum and Airfield Writers.

The Geometry Of Love Between The Elements

portraitCelia de Fréine is a poet, playwright and screenwriter who writes in Irish and English.She was born in Newtownards, County Down and moved to Dublin as a child. Retaining strong links with Northern Ireland, she spent most of her summers with her extended family in Donaghadee.
Celia has published six collections of poetry. Her sixth collection, cuir amach seo dom : riddle me this, was published by Arlen House in 2014. Her other collections are: Aibítir Aoise : Alphabet of an Age (Arlen House 2011); imram : odyssey (Arlen House 2010); Scarecrows at Newtownards (Scotus Press, 2005); Fiacha Fola (Cló Iar-Chonnachta 2004); and Faoi Chabáistí is Ríonacha (Cló Iar-Chonnachta 2001).Her poetry has been widely anthologised and translated and has won many awards, including the Patrick Kavanagh Award, the British Comparative Literature Association Translation Award and the Gradam Litríochta Chló Iar-Chonnachta.(Celia’s Homepage)Celia de Fréine at Poethead
nessaoNessa O’Mahony was born and lives in Dublin. Her poetry has appeared in a number of Irish, UK, and North American periodicals, has been translated into several European languages. She won the National Women’s Poetry Competition in 1997 and was shortlisted for the Patrick Kavanagh Prize and Hennessy Literature Awards. Her second poetry collection,Trapping a Ghost was published by bluechrome publishing in 2005. A verse novel, In Sight of Home,  was published by Salmon Poetry in May 2009 and a third poetry collection, The Side Road to Star,  was published by bluechrome in 2009. She was awarded an Irish Arts Council literature bursary in 2004. She completed a PhD in Creative and Critical Writing at the University of Wales, Bangor, in 2007. She is currently artist in residence at the John Hume Institute for Global Irish Studies at University College Dublin. She is Assistant Editor of UK literary journal Orbis.Nessa O’Mahony on Poethead
doireannDoireann Ní Ghríofa’s poems have appeared in literary journals in Ireland and internationally. Her Irish language collections Résheoid and Dúlasair are both published by Coiscéim. The Arts Council of Ireland has twice awarded her literature bursaries (2011 and 2013). In 2012, she was a winner of Wigtown Gaelic poetry contest— the Scottish National Poetry Prize. Her short collection of poems in English Ouroboros was recently longlisted for The Venture Award (UK)..

Poetry by Doireann Ní Ghriofa

maryMary Guckian was born at Kiltoghert, Co. Leitrim and has lived in Dublin since 1967 leaving to live in Sydney, Tasmania, Channel Islands and Oxford in between. Mary cut poems out of the local Leitrim Observer in her teenage years and got her first poem published in Oxford in 1983, she has gone on to publish three books of poetry, Perfume of the Soil, The Road to Gowel and Walking on Snow with Swan Press.

Her books are available in most of the public libraries. She won the Leitrim Guardian Literary Award in 2003 and 2011 for her poems and has been short-listed for the Scottish Open International Poetry Award.

She was given the Golden Pen Award for a selection of her published poetry on Art Arena website. Her poems have been widely published in literary magazines and newspapers. Mary has read her poetry in numerous places over the years, last year at the William Carlton Summer School at Clogher, Co. Tyrone and recently to celebrate 100 years of the Rathmines Public Library.

Poems by Mary Guckian

katKathy D’Arcy is a poet, workshop facilitator and youth worker based in Cork city. Originally trained as a doctor, she is currently writer in residence with Tigh Fili Cultural Centre. Her second collection, The Wild Pupil, was recently launched in Dublin by Jean O’ Brien and in Cork by Thomas McCarthy. She has just been awarded an Arts Council Artists’ Bursary to support the future development of her work.

The Wild Pupil by Kathy D’Arcy

mdMoyra Donaldson was born and brought up in Co Down and has been described as one of the country’s most distinctive and accomplished writers. She has published four previous collections, Snakeskin Stilettos (1998), Beneath The Ice (2001),The Horse’s Nest (2006) and Miracle Fruit (2010). Her poetry has won a number of awards, including the Allingham Award, the National Women’s Poetry Competition and the Cuirt New Writing Award. She has received four awards from the Arts Council NI, most recently, the Artist Career Enhancement Award.

The Goose Tree by Moyra Donaldson

rRebecca O’Connor edits The Moth Magazine and organises the Ballymaloe International Poetry Prize. She worked as a commissioning editor of literary fiction at Telegram Books in London before returning to Ireland with her family in 2008. She won a Geoffrey Dearmer Prize in 2004 and her chapbook Poems was published by the Wordsworth Trust, where she was a writer in residence in 2005. Her poetry has been published in, among other places, The Guardian, Poetry Review and The Spectator.

Poetry by Rebecca O’Connor

250px-Eavan_Boland_in_1996Eavan Boland was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1944. The daughter of a diplomat and a painter, Boland spent her girlhood in London and New York, returning to Ireland to attend secondary school in Killiney and later university at Trinity College in Dublin. Though still a student when she published her first collection, 23 Poems (1962), Boland’s early work is informed by her experiences as a young wife and mother, and her growing awareness of the troubled role of women in Irish history and culture. Over the course of her long career, Eavan Boland has emerged as one of the foremost female voices in Irish literature. Throughout her many collections of poetry, in her prose memoir Object Lessons (1995)(Poetry Foundation).

The Black Lace Fan My Mother Gave Me

Mary O’Donnell is the author of eleven books, both poetry and fiction, and has also co-edited a book of translations from the Galician. Her titles include the best-selling literary novel The Light-Makers, Virgin and the Boy, and The Elysium Testament, as well as poetry such as The Place of Miracles, Unlegendary Heroes, and her most recent critically acclaimed sixth collection The Ark Builders (Arc Publications UK, 2009). She has been a teacher and has worked intermittently in journalism, especially theatre criticism. Her essays on contemporary literary issues are widely published. She also presented and scripted three series of poetry programmes for the national broadcaster RTE Radio, including a successful series on poetry in translation during 2005 and 2006 called Crossing the Lines. Today, she teaches creative writing in a part-time capacity at NUI Maynooth, and has worked on the faculty of Carlow University Pittsburgh’s MFA programme in creative writing, as well as on the faculty of the University of Iowa’s summer writing programme at Trinity College Dublin.

Poetry by Mary O’Donnell on Poethead

img_0752Eileen Sheehan is from Killarney, Co Kerry. Her collections are Song of the Midnight Fox and Down the Sunlit Hall (Doghouse Books). Anthology publications include The Watchful Heart: A New Generation of Irish Poets (ed Joan McBreen/Salmon Poetry) and TEXT: A Transition Year English Reader (ed Niall MacMonagle/ Celtic Press). She has worked as Poet in Residence with Limerick Co Council Arts Office and is on the organizing committee for Éigse Michael Hartnett Literary & Arts Festival. Her third collection, The Narrow Place of Souls, is forthcoming.

.Poetry by Eileen Sheehan at Poethead

6474_10201515321635627_338315591_nKate O’Shea lives in Dublin. She was short listed for the Patrick Kavanagh Poetry Award 2012. Wurm Press, Scotland published her chapbook, Crackpoet, in March of 2013.She has been published in Icarus, Electric Acorn, Poetry Ireland Review Issue Number 34 (1992), The Burning Bush, Riposte, Poetry on the Lake – Silver Wyvern Anthology (Italy), Out to Lunch Anthology 2002, Poetry.com, Shamrock Haiku, Bamboo Dreams an Anthology of Haiku Poetry from Ireland, Poetry Bus 3 & 4, Outburst Magazine Issues 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 & 13, First Cut, CANCAN (Scotland) June 2013, Lucid Rhythms (U.S.A) Angle Poetry Journal, Australia (Issue 3, March 2013) and she will also be included in their hardcopy journal out soon, Turbulence magazine.

Kate O’Shea is a crack poet on Poethead

imagesMedbh McGuckian first published poems appeared in two pamphlets, All The Single Ladies: Sixteen Poems and Portrait of Joanna, in 1980, the year in which she received an Eric Gregory Award. In 1981 she co-published Trio Poetry 2 with fellow poets Damian Gorman and Douglas Marshall, and in 1989 she collaborated with Nuala Archer on Two Women, Two Shores. Medbh McGuckian’s first major collection, The Flower Master (1982), which explores post-natal breakdown, was awarded a Rooney prize for Irish Literature, an Ireland Arts Council Award (both 1982) and an Alice Hunt Bartlett Prize (1983). She is also the winner of the 1989 Cheltenham Prize for her collection On Ballycastle Beach (Wake Forest University Press). Medbh McGuckian has also edited an anthology, The Big Striped Golfing Umbrella: Poems by Young People from Northern Ireland (1985) for the Arts Council of Northern Ireland, written a study of the car in the poetry of Seamus Heaney, entitled Horsepower Pass By! (1999), and has translated into English (with Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin) The Water Horse (1999), a selection of poems in Irish by Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill. A volume of Selected Poems: 1978–1994 was published in 1997, and among her latest collections are The Book of the Angel (2004) The Currach Requires No Harbours (2007), and My Love Has Fared Inland (2008). (Wiki) On Not Being Listened To on Poethead

220px-Eva_Gore-BoothEva Selina Laura Gore-Booth (22 May 1870 – 30 June 1926) was an Irish poet and dramatist, and a committed suffragist, social worker and labour activist. She was born at Lissadell HouseCounty Sligo, the younger sister of Constance Gore-Booth, later known as the Countess Markievicz.

Both she and Constance, who later became a prominent Irish revolutionary, reacted against their privileged background and devoted themselves to helping the poor and disadvantaged. In 1895, Eva became seriously ill with threatened tuberculosis. In the following year, while convalescing in Italy, she met and fell in love with Esther Roper at the villa of Scottish writer George MacDonaldEsther Roper was the daughter of Edward Roper, a factory hand who later became a Missionary, and Annie Roper the daughter of Irish immigrants. Esther identified as half Irish. By 1896 Esther had been secretary of the North of England Society for Women’s Suffrage for four years.

Eva returned briefly to her home at Lissadell and established a Sligo branch of the Irish Women’s Suffrage and Local Government Association. Within months Eva rejected her privileged lifestyle and went to live in Manchester with Esther. They later became joint secretaries of the Women’s Textile and Other Workers Representation Committee.

In 1901 and 1902, Eva collected 67,000 signatures from textile workers, on a petition for women’s suffrage.

In 1916 Eva and Esther established a radical journal entitled ‘Urania,’ which expressed their pioneering views of gender and sexuality.[1]

In the aftermath of the 1916 Rising she was instrumental in the campaign to secure the reprieve of her sister who had been sentenced to death for her involvement.[2] Along with Alice Stopford Green she also took part in the unsuccessful campaign for the reprieve of Roger Casement.[3]

Eva was also an accomplished poet. Her first published volume was highly praised by Yeats. After World War I, Eva and Esther became members of the Committee for the Abolition of Capital Punishment and worked for prison reform.

As she grew older, Eva was forced to give up active work but continued writing poetry. Esther took care of her throughout her long illness and they were together at the end. Eva died in 1926 at her home in HampsteadLondon. (wiki) 

Form by Eva Gore-Booth

download (3)Moyra Donaldson was born and brought up in Co Down and has been described as one of the country’s most distinctive and accomplished writers. She has published four previous collections, Snakeskin Stilettos (1998), Beneath The Ice (2001),The Horse’s Nest (2006) and Miracle Fruit (2010). Her poetry has won a number of awards, including the Allingham Award, the National Women’s Poetry Competition and the Cuirt New Writing Award. She has received four awards from the Arts Council NI, most recently, the Artist Career Enhancement
 
The Goose Tree by Moyra Donaldson

caitrionaoreillyCaitríona O’Reilly (born in Dublin in 1973) is an Irish poet and critic. She took BA and PhD degrees in Archaeology and English at Trinity College, Dublin, and was awarded the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature for her poetry collection, The Nowhere Birds (2001, Bloodaxe); she has also held the Harper-Wood Studentship from St John’s College, Cambridge. She is the co-author (with David Wheatley) of a chapbook, Three-Legged Dog (Wild Honey Press, 2002); her second collection, The Sea Cabinet, followed in 2006. Her poetry can also be found in The Wake Forest Irish Poetry Series Vol.1. She is a widely published critic, has written for BBC Radio 4, translated from the Galician of María do Cebreiro, and published some fiction. She was a contributing editor of the Irish poetry journal Metre; she has collaborated with artist Isabel Nolan and in 2008 was named editor of Poetry Ireland Review. A third collection, Geis, is forthcoming from Bloodaxe and Wake Forest University Press. She has worked as ‘Poet in Residence’ at Wake Forest University and now lives in Lincoln.The Sea Cabinet was shortlisted for the Irish Times Poetry Now Award in 2007.(Wiki)

 

Hide by Catríona O’Reilly

moyaMoya Cannon was born in 1956 in Dunfanaghy, County Donegal. She studied History and Politics at University College Dublin, and at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge.
She has taught in the Gaelscoil in Inchicore, in a school for adolescent travellers in Galway, and at the National University of Ireland in Galway. She served as editor of Poetry Ireland in 1995. Her work has appeared in a number of international anthologies and she has held writer-in-residence posts for Kerry County Council and Trent University Ontario (1994–95).
Cannon became a member of Aosdána, the affiliation of creative artists in Ireland, in 2004.
Her first book, Oar, (Salmon 1990, revised edition Gallery Press 2000) won the 1991 Brendan Behan Memorial Prize. It was followed by The Parchment Boat in 1997. Carrying the Songs: New and Selected Poems was published by Carcanet Press in 2007..

Poetry by Moya Cannon on Poethead

Christine Broe 001 (2)Christine Broe, born and still lives in Dublin. She has worked as an art teacher, arts facilitator, and art therapist while looking after family of seven. She has been writing poetry since the 1990’s winning the inaugural Brendan Kennelly Award in 2001 and gained international recognition when awarded the Premio Cittá di Olbia prize in 2002. Swan Press published her debut collection Solas Sólás in 2003. She is a long time member of Rathmines Writer’s Workshop and has facilitated creative writing workshops using art media as inspiration for generating work.

Poems by Christine Broe on Poethead

mnMary Noonan lives in Cork. Her poems have been published in The Dark Horse, The North, Poetry Review, Poetry London, The Threepenny Review, Cyphers, The Stinging Fly, Wasafiri and Best of Irish Poetry 2010. She won the Listowel Poetry Collection Prize in 2010. Her first collection – The Fado House (Dedalus Press, 2012) – was shortlisted for the Seamus Heaney Centre Prize for a First Collection (2013) and the Strong/Shine Award (2013).

Mary Noonan

250px-Paula_Meehan_2009Paula Meehan was born in 1955 and raised in two famous working-class districts of Dublin, before graduating from Trinity College and Eastern Washington University. She has conducted workshops with many inner-city communities and prisons as well as universities. Her work is much translated and among the prizes she has won are The Martin Toonder Award (1995), the Butler Literary Award (1998) and the Denis Devlin Award (2002). More recently she has turned to writing plays. She continues to live in Dublin. Paula Meehan is the Ireland Professor of Poetry 2013. 

Seed by Paula Meehan

clancy_sarahSarah Clancy has been shortlisted for several poetry prizes including the Listowel Collection of Poetry Competition and the Patrick Kavanagh Award. Her first book of poetry, Stacey and the Mechanical Bull, was published by Lapwing Press Belfast in December 2010 and a further selection of her work was published in June 2011 by Doire Press. Her poems have been published in Revival Poetry Journal, The Stony Thursday Book, The Poetry Bus, Irish Left Review and in translation in Cuadrivio Magazine (Mexico). She was the runner up in the North Beach Nights Grand Slam Series 2010 and was the winner of the Cúirt International Festival of Literature Grand Slam 2011. She has read her work widely at events such as Cúirt and as a featured reader at the Over the Edge reading series in Galway, the Temple House Festival, Testify, Electric Picnic, O Bheal and at the Irish Writers’ Centre, she was an invited guest at the 2011 Vilenica Festival of Literature in Slovenia and in Spring 2012 her poem “I Crept Out” received second prize in the Ballymaloe International Poetry Competition.

Sarah Clancy on Poethead 

rosemarie672Rosemarie Rowley has written extensively in form: Flight into Reality (1989) is the longest original work in terza rima in English, reprinted 2010 and now available on CD. She has also written in rhyme royal and rhyming couplets. She has four times won the Epic award in the Scottish International Open Poetry Competition. Her books in print are: The Sea of Affliction (1987,one of the first works in ecofeminism, reprinted 2010, and Hot Cinquefoil Star, (2002) (which contains The Puzzle Factory a crown of sonnets and Letter to Kathleen Raine in rhyming couplets). Her most recent book is In Memory of Her (2004, 2008) which includes Betrayal into Origin – Dancing & Revolution in the Sixties (an 80 stanza poem in decima rima (ten line rhyme) and The Wake of Wonder (a regular sonnet sequence) and many other sonnets; all books, except her first, The Broken Pledge (1985, Martello) published by Rowan Tree Ireland Press, Dublin.In 2003, she co-edited, with town planner John Haughton, an anthology of tree poems, Seeing the Wood and the Trees (Rowan Tree Press with Cairde na Coille)Rosemarie has given papers for academic conferences in the Universities of Galway and Limerick and the Clinton Institute (UCD) in Ireland, in Bath, Edinburgh, St. Andrews’ and Stirling, Louisville, Sarasota and Atlanta Universities in the USA. in the UK, and in Prague, Venice, Paris ,and Valladolid on the European mainland. She has been active in the green movement in Ireland and in the Irish Byron Society and worked for a time in the European institutions in Europe.Rosemarie has degrees in Irish and English Literature, and philosophy from Trinity College Dublin, an M.Litt on the nature poet Patrick Kavanagh, and a diploma in psychology from NUI.

  Rosemary Rowley on Poethead

khardie7Kerry Hardie was born in 1951 and grew up in County Down. She now lives in County Kilkenny with her husband, the writer Seán Hardie. Her poems have won many prizes. The Gallery Press has published A Furious Place (1996), Cry for the Hot Belly (2000), The Sky Didn’t Fall (2003), The Silence Came Close (2006), Only This Room (2009) and Selected Poems (2011). Her first novel, Hannie Bennet’s Winter Marriage appeared in 2000; another, The Bird Woman was published in 2006. Kerry is a member of Aosdána. (from The Southword Journal)


Kerry Hardie on Poethead

Kate Dempsey’s poetry is widely published in Ireland and the UK including Poetry Ireland Review,The Shop, Orbis and MKate Dempsey Hennessy shortlist February 2006 Pic: Mark Condrenagma. She won The Plough Prize and has been shortlisted for the Hennessy Award for both poetry and fiction. She was selected to read for Poetry Ireland Introductions and Windows Publications Introductions, as well as at various arts and music festivals with the Poetry Divas. She is grateful for bursaries received from the Arts Council, Dublin South County Council and Kildare County Council. Kate blogs at Writing.ie and Emerging Writer. Her latest work is part of The Moth Collection, Little Editions

Poetry by Kate Dempsey on Poethead

5 thoughts on “Contemporary Irish Women Poets

  1. Thank you. I started the blog when numerous strands of my interests came together, the rise of European inter-war women poets and the early modernists (WW1-WW2), and because of the lack of review/study/citation/anthologising of Irish women poets. There is a lot of interest and search activity on the site which is great: I am not the only one wanting to read these women. The searches are often based in a remembered line or image from a poem and often not by author name.

  2. What a great site. No doubt teachers and lecturers will find this extremely useful.

    I love the fact that although I have come across many of these poets through their publications and poetry readings over the last few years, there are writers here whose work I have yet to discover.

    Great stuff! :)

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