Copyright Reform in Ireland

I hope that those artists and developers who are interested in broadening out the discussion on a proposed new copyright regime in Ireland visit and contribute to this site, http://copyrightreform.ie/  Legislators should be aware that reform begins at the level of innovation, and not through the offices of intermediaries whose aims appear to be grounded in the short-term.

Copyright Reform In Ireland
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“This site is intended to give the public a chance to comment on, and hopefully improve, the text of a proposed submission to the Copyright Review Commission. For information on the working group that produced this text see Who We Are.

It works like this:

Look to the left of this page. See the Table Of Contents? Go to the bit of the document that looks like it interests you.

Now, each paragraph can be commented on individually. Just click on the little blue speech bubble to add your own comment. You will be able to see all the comments on the right hand side of every page, beside the text.

In addition, we will be making the full text available as both a pdf and in an editable format under the Irish Creative Commons Attribution licence. If you agree with some parts of this submission, but not others, please feel free to download this text, make the changes to the parts you think should be different, and send it to the Copyright Review Committee at copyrightreview@djei.ie.

I  am adding the link here because it is imperative that people who wish to protect and to disseminate original works online know the facts about the breadth of current discussions.

I have noted in meetings and in casual discussion that quite a few people are not even fully aware of the headings of the discussions which will have wide-ranging implications in Ireland’s creative community.

There are just days left for artists and individuals to have their say about how they transmit their work. I am very interested in the fact that the most contentious issue has been in the arena of fair-use and that media discussions, with notable exceptions, have been limited to government press-releases, sound bytes and usage of buzz-words like , criminalisation, blocking and banning !

 It would appear that politicians do not trust the artistic encounter, and that the intermediary believes that they know what is best for everyone. The fact that creative practices do not occur at intermediary level has wholly escaped our political and business communities. Companies who are willing to deprive the artistic community of tools including those of free-speech, to corner a market are depriving a community of innovation. I am pretty sure Ireland should not be beholden to vested interests when it comes to intellectual property no matter how prettily business people may ask.

A list of those who have submitted on the issue of copyright reform in Ireland is available here , http://www.djei.ie/science/ipr/crc.htm and I am re-posting my submission on Arts and the Public Domain; arts practice as culturally necessary here, http://poethead.wordpress.com/2012/05/18/my-submission-to-the-the-copyright-review-committee-2012/

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